Visiting | Sunrise At The Louvre & Eiffel Tower

… and worth every minute capturing a few of historic landmark gems.

When it comes to capturing the beauty of the world-famous Louvre museum, there is no better time than at 5am during the blue hour. The blue hour is one of the most magical times of day when the light is especially soft and flattering, and the colors of the city take on a beautiful hue.

At 5am, the streets of Paris are still quiet and relatively empty, so it’s the perfect time to capture the Louvre in all its glory. The sun is just beginning to rise and the light is still low enough to give the building a mysterious and captivating feel. The iconic glass pyramid, located at the museum’s entrance, is especially stunning during the blue hour as it reflects the soft blues of the sky.

If you’re hoping to get the perfect shot of the Louvre, don’t forget to explore all of the other areas of the museum. The courtyard and grounds offer some of the most beautiful views of the building, and the ornate sculptures, fountains and other architectural features add a unique and special touch.

No matter what type of camera you use, you’ll be able to capture the beauty of the Louvre at 5am during the blue hour. Whether you shoot with a DSLR, a point-and-shoot, or even just your smartphone, you’ll be able to capture the magic of one of the world’s most iconic buildings. So don’t miss out on this special time of day – the Louvre at 5am during the blue hour is an experience you won’t soon forget!

I did the same again the following day, but this time I jumped in a taxi and headed for the Eiffel Tower.

Arriving just in time to find my angles, photographing the Eiffel Tower at sunrise is an experience like no other. The morning light brings out the beauty of the iconic structure, and the early morning hours provide a peaceful atmosphere that is perfect for capturing some stunning shots.

If you’re planning to take a trip to the Eiffel Tower and want to photograph it at sunrise, you’ll need to plan ahead. The best time to visit the Tower is between 5:30am and 8:00am, so you’ll want to make sure you arrive earlier than that to get the best light. It’s also important to note that the Tower is closed from 1:00am to 5:30am, so you’ll need to plan accordingly if you want to get the shots you’re looking for.

When you arrive, it’s best to scout out the area and decide where you want to take your photos from. Depending on the time of year, you may be able to find some amazing spots with a clear view of the Tower. Make sure you also bring a tripod to keep your camera steady and get the best shots.

Once you have your spot(s), it’s time to start shooting. The light is constantly changing during the sunrise, so it’s important to stay alert and adjust your settings accordingly. If you have a DSLR, you’ll want to use a slower shutter speed to capture the dynamic light and keep your camera steady. No matter what kind of equipment you have, photographing the Eiffel Tower at sunrise will provide you with some incredible and unique shots.

After this, it was simply a nice day in Paris. I visited Notre Dame, Pantheon, I walked along the Seine, found the best chocolatier in town – Maison Fondee, and had THE BEST Croque Monsieur I’ve ever had in what looked like a very parisien cafe – Café Panis – right next to Notre Dame. A bold statement but for me it was true–The setting, the staff, the food, the view… wonderful!

All-in-all, it was fantastic to have a career that takes me to such wonderful places, and this was a great way to see what I could cram into the short freetime that I had here. Au Revoir, Paris… Until we meet again!

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